Thursday, August 06, 2009

Sincerely, John Hughes


I was babysitting for my mom's friend Kathleen's daughter the night I wrote that first fan letter to John Hughes. I can literally remember the yellow grid paper, the blue ball point pen and sitting alone in the dim light in the living room, the baby having gone to bed.

I poured my heart out to John, told him about how much the movie mattered to me, how it made me feel like he got what it was like to be a teenager and to feel misunderstood.

(I felt misunderstood.)

I sent the letter and a month or so later I received a package in the mail with a form letter welcoming me as an "official" member of The Breakfast Club, my reward a strip of stickers with the cast in the now famous pose.

I was irate.

I wrote back to John, explaining in no uncertain terms that, excuse me, I just poured my fucking heart out to you and YOU SENT ME A FORM LETTER.

That was just not going to fly.

He wrote back.

"This is not a form letter. The other one was. Sorry. Lots of requests. You know what I mean. I did sign it."

He wrote back and told me that he was sorry, that he liked my letter and that it meant a great deal to him. He loved knowing that his words and images resonated with me and people my age. He told me he would say hi to everyone on my behalf.

"No, I really will. Judd will be pleased you think he's sexy. I don't."

I asked him if he would be my pen pal.

He said yes.

"I'd be honored to be your pen pal. You must understand at times I won't be able to get back to you as quickly as I might want to. If you'll agree to be patient, I'll be your pen pal."


For two years (1985-1987), John Hughes and I wrote letters back and forth. He told me - in long hand black felt tip pen on yellow legal paper - about life on a film set and about his family. I told him about boys, my relationship with my parents and things that happened to me in school. He laughed at my teenage slang and shared the 129 question Breakfast Club trivia test I wrote (with the help of my sister) with the cast, Ned Tanen (the film's producer) and DeDe Allen (the editor). He cheered me on when I found a way around the school administration's refusal to publish a "controversial" article I wrote for the school paper. And he consoled me when I complained that Mrs. Garstka didn't appreciate my writing.

"As for your English teacher…Do you like the way you write? Please yourself. I'm rather fond of writing. I actually regard it as fun. Do it frequently and see if you can't find the fun in it that I do."


He made me feel like what I said mattered.

"I can't tell you how much I like your comments about my movies. Nor can I tell you how helpful they are to me for future projects. I listen. Not to Hollywood. I listen to you. I make these movies for you. Really. No lie. There's a difference I think you understand."


"It's been a month of boring business stuff. Grown up, adult, big people meetings. Dull but necessary. But a letter from Alison always makes the mail a happening thing."


"I may be writing about young marriage. Or babies. Or Breakfast Club II or a woman's story. I have a million ideas and can't decide what's next. I guess I'll just have to dive into something. Maybe a play."

"You've already received more letters from me than any living relative of mine has received to date. Truly, hope all is well with you and high school isn't as painful as I portray it. Believe in yourself. Think about the future once a day and keep doing what you're doing. Because I'm impressed. My regards to the family. Don't let a day pass without a kind thought about them."


There were a few months in 1987 when I didn't hear from John. I missed his letters and the strength and power and confidence they gave me and so I sent a letter to Ned Tanen who, by that time, was the President of Paramount Pictures (he died earlier this year). In my letter I asked Mr. Tanen if he knew what was up with John, why he hadn't been writing and if he could perhaps give him a poke on my behalf.

He did.

I came home from school soon after to find an enormous box on my front porch filled with t-shirts and tapes and posters and scripts and my very own Ferris Bueller's Day Off watch.

And a note.

"I missed you too. Don't get me in trouble with my boss any more. Sincerely, John Hughes."


Fast forward.

1997. I was working in North Carolina on a diversity education project that partnered with colleges and universities around the country to implement a curriculum that used video production as an experiential education tool. On a whim, I sent John a video about the work we were doing. I was proud of it and, all these years later, I wanted him to be proud too.

Late one night I was in the office, scheduled to do an interview with a job candidate. Ten minutes or so into the call it was clear that he wasn't the right guy, but I planned to suffer through.

Then the phone rang.

1…2…3…4…a scream came from the other room and 1…2…3…my boss Tony was standing in my doorway yelling, "John Hughes is on the phone!!"

I politely got off the phone with the job candidate who was no longer a candidate and

Hit. Line. Two.

"Hi, John."

"Hi, Alison."

We talked for an hour. It was the most wonderful phone call. It was the saddest phone call. It was a phone call I will never forget.


John told me about why he left Hollywood just a few years earlier. He was terrified of the impact it was having on his sons; he was scared it was going to cause them to lose perspective on what was important and what happiness meant. And he told me a sad story about how, a big reason behind his decision to give it all up was that "they" (Hollywood) had "killed" his friend, John Candy, by greedily working him too hard.


He also told me he was glad I had gotten in touch and that he was proud of me for what I was doing with my life. He told me, again, how important my letters had been to him all those years ago, how he often used the argument "I'm doing this for Alison" to justify decisions in meetings.

Tonight, when I heard the news that John had died, I cried. I cried hard. (And I'm crying again.) I cried for a man who loved his friends, who loved his family, who loved to write and for a man who took the time to make a little girl believe that, if she had something to say, someone would listen.

Thank you, John Hughes. I love you for what you did to make me who I am.

Sincerely, Alison Byrne Fields.

1,416 comments:

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Anonymous said...

John Hughes totally got it right in his movies. I hold Planes, Trains and Automobiles in my top 3 favorite movies of my entire life. Every single time I think of the airport scene, I just crack up. Thank you John for your gifts to us, you will never be forgotten!

Comedy Doc said...

Alison,

Thank you for being the mouth piece for all John Hughes fans. Hopefully he knew that you were one of millions who appreciated his work more than just being entertained.

John Hughes defined our generation. He was likely the first and certainly one of the most influential individuals on thje trend of pop culture.

He made us all feel comfortable with who we were during the toughestyears of our lives whether we were popular, weird, athletic or just off beat. He taught us that we're all just the same. And then, in the end, he taught us what was most important. Family and friends. We lost him twice. This past week and once when he decided his family was more important than Hollywood. That may have been the most important lesson of all. Maybe not even it being about Hollywood specifically, but about, well, the fact that life moves pretty fast and if you don't stop and take a look around once in a while, you could miss it.

Rest in Peace, John. Thank you for doing it for Alsion, and all of us.

Anonymous said...

Apart form the tender memories and wonderful touches you remembered that showed how human both you and John Hughes were with each other, I was equally impressed that you were able to keep your relationship with him private and special, that you didn't need to go around bragging to your friends who you knew and who was writing you. That fact is a testimony to your values as a friend and a good person.

Doctor TOC said...

Alison,

Thanks for sharing this. I'm very sorry for the loss of your friend. I hope your sadness is lightened somewhat by the memory of what you meant to him.

Slyde said...

wow. im glad i stumbled across your site today.

while i didnt have a personal relationship with john as you did, his work meant alot to me, a child of the 80's.

i also wrote a tribute to john, over on my site. i'd love to hear your take on it.

all the best.

Tony said...

What a beautiful and moving eulogy. You should gather your correspondence and write a book about your pen pal, his work, and how his movies and his letters changed your life.

Rick Daley said...

Thanks for sharing. You are fortunate to have had such a special relationship with such a gifted man, and he was fortunate to have such a special relationship with a heartfelt person such as you.

Filipe said...

I am the teenager i am today beacause of John Hughes. I was a fan of many of his films: Ferris Beuller, Home Alone, Pretty in pink, etc. But it was, an obvious choice i know, Breakfast Club that showed me how much Hughes understood the teenager that didn't fit the norm, the first movie i felt a connection to,for that and the years of memories i thank John Hughes RIP

Bill Smith said...

Alison,

Thank you for sharing this, I think you up summed it up better than the rest of us out there. I too grew up in the 1980s and watched John Hughes movies. He got us, pure and simple and to have someone tell our stories complete with a cool soundtrack, was rare.

You were very fortunate to have Hughes as a mentor and a pen pal. I think it was sad to find out the background story on why he left the movie business.

I am feeling old all of a sudden...

Bill Smith

"Life moves pretty quick, if you don't stop and look around you could miss it."- Ferris Bueller

Kimberly said...

Wow, wow, wow.

I was (am) a huge John Hughes fan before, but after reading this am So. Much. More.

What a great story, thank you for sharing it with us.

red mum said...

What an amazing post, and what an amazing relationship youse had. Like many others who grew up in the 1980s i loved his movies and am blown away that he took the time to respond to you, never mind years of correspondence.

Thanks for sharing.

Brown haired girl from Stockholm town said...

This post brought tears to my eyes (also). I loved John Hughes' films so much. They really meant a great deal to me, growing up in the 80's.

This blogpost must be the best post ever in the history of the internet. Legendary.

Anonymous said...

Hi Alison,

This is wonderful. Thank you for sharing this with the world. Your letters to each make me think of modern day letters Rainer Marie Rilke and Franz Kappus wrote to each other in Letters to a Young Poet.

John Hughes helped me grow up, and I will never forget him for that.

Thank you again.

Meredith

jess said...

As tears roll down my cheeks I can only echo what so many others in this thread have already written: Thank you so much for sharing.

Anonymous said...

Wow,
That made me respect him even more. We will all miss him, and my heart goes out to you who had a special relationship with this great man. I wished for the day that I might have met him. Thank you for sharing this.

Anonymous said...

This post made me a little misty. How often do you hear of a Hollywood director/producer who is actually kind of a great person?

This video made me misty too- the Top 5 scenes from John Hughes movies. Especially #1.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61EWLKDvYFU

alexa - cleveland's a plum said...

thank you very much for this post and a great story that moved me.

MissKitty said...

You said it. His movies were important to us. They spoke to us. We'll miss him.

fdiamond said...

Very nice article, Alison. I am curious. Why did the pen-pal back-and-forth not last more than two years? Did it just sort of sputter out the way these things do?

Beth in DC said...

Thank you so much for sharing this. My husband heard about your post through a friend on Facebook and shared it with me (and his friends.)

I am sorry for your loss, but thank you so much for sharing.

Beth

miguel said...

Thank you for sharing this Allison. I felt like I had lost a part of my childhood when I heard of Mr. Hughes' passing. I remember feeling like he was the only adult that understood how it felt to be a teenager. After reading this, I feel like I could learn a lesson or two from him about what it means to truly be an adult. Thank you again.

ZDub said...

AWESOME.

Thank you for sharing your story.

ZDub said...

AWESOME.

Thank you for sharing your story.

grumblegirl said...

I loved him too, for all the reasons you described... good for you for continuing to write. I loved your piece. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for sharing. I along with many people who have read this, we thank you.John Hughes was a great man. He reached out to many of us. Some of us were those characters in his movies. We are the dreamers, and the lost children who just want to be heard, noticed and accepted. He reminded us of our underestamated potential-that we still have so much life to give. Remember Ferris Bueller's buddy, Cameron? He siad this: "I am not going to sit on my ass as the events that affect me unfold to determine the course of my life. I'm going to take a stand. I'm going to defend it. Right or wrong, I'm going to defend it."

Let us remember to be strong willed like that. Thank you Alison, for reminding us all that we have that will and that these little moments matter. I know John Hughes would be very very proud.

Charmaine said...

I heard you on public radio. What an unbelievable story. Wow.

danof89@gmail.com said...

A truly touching and candid look at the man that brought us all closer through his art. I am glad to know that not only did he embody what he was selling, but that his wit and humor is so personally identifiable when it comes to the everyday.
I think we all wish that we could have had the same window of opportunity that you had with a man that meant so much to us. So, I thank you for sharing such a personal and treasured memory with those that will miss the man and the stories that resonate so strongly, generation to generation. Timeless.

Thank You,

D A N (Go Figg'r)

Ildane said...

Thank you so much for this view of a man who really shepherded us through our teens the way Mr. Rogers got us through our tike years. Thank you for sharing a look at his integrity, which in its way, continues to guide us forward. I have not read your blog before today, but I will be back.

-Dag (I had a "Bueller" tape in the late 80s that was a staple for many late nights with most of my college roommates... when Cameron was in Egypt land, let my ... Cameron ... gooooo... Frye, Frye Frye...)

LegalMist said...

What a beautiful tribute to a wonderful man. Thanks for sharing.

dj scribbles said...

this brought me to tears. as a teenager, and not having grown up with that - this resonates with me in a different way than if i had grown up then. thank you for sharing this incredible story - i dont have any words that would describe it or my feelings about it adequetly

BCMike said...

Thank you for writing this.

Maybe now you know what John Hughes felt like when he had a profound impact beyond what he could have possibly imagined.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for sharing. I am weeping for you and for all of us. At 42 I can still recite "Sixteen Candles" word for word to my husband's amazement since I can't remember my list when I go to the grocery store. Thanks for proving to me that the high esteem I hold him in is completely worthwhile.

WiseGuy said...

Alison:

I need to add my voice to the thousand before me. Thank you. John Hughes indeed captured the spirit, hopes, and dreams of a generation. And as my son watches Ferris Bueller, I am reminded that his influence still lives on.

Thank you for sharing your story. But thanks too for being who you are and providing an inspiration to someone so inspirational.

All the best to you forever.

Heather said...

Allison, For those of us who grew up alongside everything John Hughes, this is a rare and beautiful glimpse of the man behind the work. What an amazing person! What a gift your perseverance mined for you, John, and us! Best, Heather

euskir said...

Dear Alison:
Well, even when most of the films I love are far from John's style, some of his films are part of my life too, and there's some kind of signature message from me when society can't count anymore with the most interesting artists: "thanks John, thanks for the films you share with us", and, thanks to you Alison, thanks for such a beautiful and heartfelt article.
Best wishes, as always,

Federico (aka euskir)

Anonymous said...

Alison, this is the best epitaph there could be for John Hughes. I never knew much about the man or even how he looked but I too love his movies. I hoped he would return & re-re-invent the teen movie stripping out all the crudity of our times but sadly that will now never be. Your account reveals the man to have the heart his movies portray. Im sorry his life & your beautiful adventure with him has ended but your story in life remains unwritten and lays ahead of you. In a perfect world the next John Hughes movie would be based on your account told thru your eyes & I wouldnt be suprised if Chris Columbus or Howard Dutch (If hes still alive) or someone sees this story & thinks likewise. John Hughes told you to write, it is your destiny to write this... you are sitting on a wealth of dreams! Write your story - write your life, feel those teenage moments & unleash them on the page punctuated by solace in his movies & letters. See you at Detention ;)
Take Care & good luck.
Ray

genia said...

Alison, thank you for sharing your story and privilage of knowing Mr. Hughes. When my daughter was in an auto accident several years ago, I was facing a multitude of doctors at a hospital and lots of stress. a friend of mine lent me his travel trailer and a home alone video. When I was stressed out , i went to the trailer and watched the home alone video and laughed. I will always have an admiration and gratitude for this man for helping me out in hard times. I have all the home alone movies, and several of his others. My daughter and I still watch The Breakfast Club together. She was in highschool during the 80's. The world is a better place because of John Hughes, sincerely genia and april

Mrs. Fog said...

This is so beautiful. I cried just now. He meant so much to an entire generation. Thank you for sharing such a heartfelt and honest exchange.

Lesley "Chase" Barton said...

I posted this on another blog where I found a comment referring to your blog. After reading your lovely tribute that absolutely warmed my heart, I thought you would enjoy reading my comment. Here it is:

"For the last week before this news hit, I kept thinking to myself, "What happened to John Hughes?" It just struck me out of no where. I kept promising myself that I was going to do some research online about him, however, I never found the time. Then one day I clicked on the internet and there sprawled shockingly across my homepage "John Hughes dead at 59" I still can barely catch my breath. I hadn't thought about him in the longest time and when I did, just a week later, he was gone along with the inexplicably precise re-creator of my youth.

I grew up in John Hughes land. The REAL John Hughes land. The area that all of his movies were based upon. I watched four (not three ;-) of them being filmed, drove the same cars, had the same relationships, witnessed and belonged to the same cliques, and even attended a number of breakfast clubs first hand.

To this day, I still get tickled literally "pink" from one of my fondest memories where the fantastically funny and sorely missed John Candy pointed at my stockingless feet in my pretty in pink pumps on a below freezing day and exclaimed to the other real life "Planes, Trains, and Automobiles" neighbors to "get that girl some socks." John Candy is to this day one of the kindest individuals I had ever had the privilege to meet and John Hughes was one of the most brilliant creative minds I have ever had the privilege to witness.

With the passing of John Hughes it is in many ways so sadly the final passing of my youth, however, gratefully that youth and John Hughes will forever be immortalized in films that will never ever truly pass away."

GRINKS said...

Beautiful. Thank you for sharing. RIP John Hughes, from chile

Aunt Julie said...

Oh my gosh. This blew my mind. I was so saddened by his loss. I thank you so much for sharing who he was with us. It makes me feel even better about the significance of his movies to me. Thank you!!!

Sharon Summers said...

Dearest Allison,

Thank you for sharing your beautiful words and your wonderful account on the realtionship you had with John Hughes. My girlfriends and I grew up watching Sixteen Candles and The Breakfast Club dreaming over the guys and wishing we could be Molly. The world has lost a wonderful man and how amazing to have known him! He was a great man who could make simple teenagers such as ourselves feel special while watching his movies. Whatever role you played I'm glad you were in his life! I hope you continue to write! Writing for me has been so rewarding even if just ONE person reads what I have to say and enjoys it or better yet; smiles! Take care Allison and thank you once again for sharing this with the rest of us! I will add your Blog to my Favorites so I can read this article again and again!

Best Wishes,
~Sharon

Rose Vanden Eynden said...

Thank you, Alison, for sharing John Hughes with all of us. You were a lucky girl--and we were all lucky to have grown up with his insightful movies. Blessings to you.

Angie said...

Thank you Alison. I came here via Postcards from the Mothership and I'm so glad I took the time. Beautiful.

Anonymous said...

Made my eyes water too. I am touched that someone famous, well liked, and successful would take time out of his day to write to a kid. That's flat out awesome. I got lucky like that later in life, but as a kid? No way. No one gave me the time on their watch.

I guess I wasn't different enough from the other kids. I've still managed to lead a charmed life, though, and I hope to one day repay the favor.

Meli said...

he was amazing and so are you...

Anonymous said...

This is a beautiful blog post and a great tribute. What a wonderful story!

Anonymous said...

This blog is so touching, we Japanese also loved Mr Highes. Thank u, Alison-chan, -- Mitsuko, from Tokyo

the Lumpia said...

My sympathies to you! Thank you for sharing your story. As an adult -- you really don't need to make a huge splash or gesure to make an impact on a child's life: you just need to listen and share. What an awesome mentor you had. I love that you had the gumption to just ask for something and then speak your mind if you weren't getting what you thought you were getting --and you didn't feel 'entitled'. I'm saving this blog post for my 10 month old daughter.

Best,
Tilda

Paler than Gold said...

Your marvellous story made my heart sing. I am so happy you shared this. Thank you.

Ianthe said...

WOW!
Amazing story.

ohbrooke said...

*eyes glued*

This was fascinating to read. What a wonderful story, of your bravery and friendship. Not only did he mean something to you - it sounds like you meant a great deal to him.

Chris B said...

Thank you sooo much for sharing this! This is one of the most amazing things i have EVER read, i even shed a tear for john as i finished your article. What a truly remarkable man John Hughes was. may he rest in peace.

All the Best,
Chris

Anonymous said...

What a lovely thing you have written. I never thought much of John Hughes but this makes me see him in a new light of respect.

Anonymous said...

they buried him today, i cry for thee o JOHN Hughes. thanks Alison

Dayne | TheHappySelf.com said...

John Hughes RIP. What a legend. He made movies that mattered and spoke to a generation. He will be greatly missed.

Anonymous said...

This is a heartfelt tribute you've written here. I, myself, watched John Hughes teenage films when i was in my early 30s in the mid 1980s. I guess i always wondered if i should, at my age then, have liked them as much as i did. There was a kind of fresh quality to them and a lightheartedness that also depicted human truths somehow.

You are very fortunate to have befriended John Hughes (& he considered himself likewise fortunate to have found you as a friend). Thanks for sharing here your appreciation of knowing him.

SAM. said...

thanks for sharing this (:

http://almostlikesushi.blogspot.com

Jack Yan said...

What an incredible story. I really felt transported in this decade-long story. Thank you for sharing, and for reminding those of us who enjoyed John’s work from afar that there was a real man there, ready to engage people on such a personal level.

kathrine said...

Alison, Thank you so much for sharing. This is beyond beautiful and touching.

lee said...

Hi Alison - Thanks for sharing this - I am so envious of you! John saw the extraordinary in the ordinary - so gifted. I wonder if the fact he did not have a daughter in his life brought him to you? I have often wondered if the relationship between John and Molly Ringwald was also about that. I am sure you cherish your contact with him always. RIP John

-Duncan Wilder Johnson, Boston, MA said...

Man, I'm crying now after reading that. Woah...

Jake Cordova said...

This is a fantastic read. Thank you for sharing it with us, Alison.

Reisvid from Baltimore said...

Alison -

A friend sent this link to me and I'm glad he did. How lucky for you and him that you were able to have a pen pal like John Hughes. He left his mark on the world, and what more can anyone ask for. And now with your story you are leaving your mark too. Thanks so much for sharing your story. It is inspirational!

Sorry for your loss and for all of us, but what wonderful movies we will be able to watch for a very long time!

Christine said...

What a wonderful post! I'm the administrator of The John Hughes Files at http://www.riverblue.com/hughes/ and I have placed a link there to your entry, if it's okay. (If not, please let me know and I'll remove it.) I'm out of the news loop right now and it was a day later when I walked past the U.S.A. Today newspaper kiosk and decided to look at the front page for some reason...and I gasped! I couldn't believe it!!! He's not very old, born the same year as my dad, so how could he be gone already? I never did try to contact John Hughes over the course of the years, but I really enjoyed hearing about your relationship with him. How wonderful! :-)

Elsje Fiederelsje said...

Wow. This is a seriously touching story. It makes me happy whenever I hear about people like John Hughes, who are aware of the difference they can make in another persons life. I am deeply sorry for your loss.

Greg said...

This was lovely, Alison. Thanks so much for sharing the John you knew with us. Isn't it great when people really connect with one another?

It's up to us to keep passing such magic along.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for writing this and for being who you are.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for writing this and for being who you are.

JT said...

What a fantastic story. Thank you for sharing it! Needless to say, you are one of the luckiest people ever. But aside from that, it's great that you got to know a different side of John Hughes, and that you got to share it with us.

Anonymous said...

Alison, I loved all his movies, but especially The Breakfast Club. I think every teen secretly suspects that when you grow up your soul does indeed die. Thankfully John Hughes' soul didn't die and he was able to give a cautionary tale to the then future parents, teachers, and leaders of today's children and teens: don't forget what it was like to be one of us.

Lady P said...

what an honor for both of you to have shared thoughts and dreams for so many years
and what an honor to have you share them with us now
i am dumbstruck
and i am reminded that we are all great, we are all daring to dream and that we all need a great visionary on our side, for a second, a year, a letter's worth, a call
you both made a difference
because you connected and you cared
this post has sent ripples of love throughout a community connected by words
amen to that

Cosmic Hooker said...

My faith in the power of words ... real words in the world of today has just been renewed. Thank you for this.

Mari said...

I know there are probably too many comments to read, but on the off chance that you do, I just wanted to thank you for sharing your story and history with John Hughes. I never heard stories about his personal life, but with your insight of him, I can love his movies even more. It's not surprising that these wonderful, heartfelt, and funny movies came from the mind of such a good man. I also agree with you that Duckie was the better man. ;)

Stiggles said...

Thank you for sharing - that was a beautiful tribute to a wonderful man.

Julian said...

Hi Alison,

Thanks for sharing this story. I too was touched by The Breakfast Club. I remember watching it 3 times in one day when I started at university.

It's so nice to see another side of John Hughes and to understand why he stopped making the films that made the 80's what they were.

Anonymous said...

In 2004 I was on guard duty in Iraq. I was hot angry and scared. I had an ING (Iraqi National Guardsman) with me, named Sami-(we called him Sammy Sosa) He spoke little English, but when I asked him what his favorite movie was he told me "Breakfast Club-Hughs."

I expected to hear some Ballywood cult hit I never heard of.

This kid actually learned English by memorizing dialog from Breakfast Club, off a pirated video.

Anyway that's my story hope it was relevant to the topic.

Skwint said...

thank you for sharing that - his movies meant so much to me growing up. i still watch them today - trying to show my kids what real films are like.

Nurse Practitioners Save Lives said...

I'm sure that you won't have the time to go through all of the many wonderful comments. There are few in this life who really touch people and make an impact. My husband and I really enjoyed his movies and are always saddened when yet again another "great" passes on. I can only hope to make such an impact on someone's life some day.

StacieDee said...

Thank you so much for generously sharing your story; it's wonderful to know that the kindness he put into his movies was real.

I'm sorry for your loss.

Adam said...

I really appreciated your story. I linked to it in my own Hughes tribute and included a soundtrack for Ferris Bueller's Day Off (an offical soundtrack was never released, and John helped me get all the music):

http://darthmojo.wordpress.com/2009/08/14/music-post-ferris-buellers-day-off/

Andy Fay said...

Funny isn't it, I was a 17 year old living in a pokey backwater county of England called Wiltshire, (where Stonehenge comes from), when I first saw 'Some Kind of Wonderful'.

I found it amazing, as you said, because it told a story of the normal guys, not the heroes, not the beauties. It was honest, and it was kind.

Didn't realise till I read your post it was a John Hughes film, and when I read your account of JH, I put two and two together. I realised that it resonated with such honesty and kindness because the director was honest and kind.

Thanks for your post.

Suzanna said...

thank you so much for sharing this with the world.

Anonymous said...

Hey ! impressive blog you have....it presents the psycology of teenagers....i like your block....Thanks for sharing your experience with all of us.

gaurvi
orangy teenagers

Favorite... said...

What a wonderful story to read, thank you for sharing.

As a fan of John's, I would love to see what he wrote. How priceless those letters are!

It just goes to show how passionate, sensitive and decent a man John was. His loss as a writer, director and a human being will be felt for ages.

Reading this blog and Molly's tribute to John in the NY Times, you can "understand" why John disappeared. His early work was so deeply personal and he wanted everyone to feel the same way. I know I did. John's early work made me feel for those characters, even if they were not the nicest people.

My heart goes out to John's family and friends.

David K. M. Klaus said...

I'm crying my eyes out.

Thank you.

Truthteller said...

Hi Alison, I saw Pretty in Pink and Some Kind of Wonderful in the theaters! There are really strong, resiliant female characters in those films.

Anonymous said...

this is magical

Anonymous said...

Thank you.

Deeders said...

I don't think I understood why I loved his movies so much until I read this. Any art form, when it is great, can open our eyes to hidden enclaves of emotion and understanding we would never discover without it. Your essay did that for me. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

Don't you forget about me.

Anonymous said...

fuck yeah.

Gina said...

Lovely.

Gina said...

Lovely.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for sharing this.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for writing this and validating everything I feel when I watch John Hughes' fantastic movies. Thank you!

Krista said...

Allison,

This was a very moving tribute to a complex, wonderful, thoughful man. Thank you so much for sharing this experience. I have passed it on to all of my friends and family as a reminder to us all to never forget the power of words, of hearing and of being heard.

Christie said...

Thank you so much for sharing your story with us. John Hughes spoke to a generation of teens in their own language and clearly made an important difference in your life. We lost him too soon.

Jonquil said...

What a lovely memoir; thank you for writing it down. I'm glad you and he had that friendship.

Ryan Spaulding said...

John didn't even have to be famous for your story to be important to me as a reader... And, let me say - I enjoyed his work but have found a depth to this tale just a bit more interesting than those on the silver screen. Sometimes the most beautiful art is completely unintended and most definitely real. Thank you for sharing.

Karen said...

Wow! I just came across this by accident. Thank you for sharing it with me, and all of us. He will definitely be missed by so many.

Cathy said...

Alison,

Thank you so much for taking the time to share the incredible gift of your relationship with John Hughes. It's really sad to learn, only after his death, how much his whole body of work touched my life and influenced who I am. It was always obvious from watching his movies what a sensitive person he was, and that he "got it", but now after reading your tribute, I can truly appreciate what a wonderful and talented man he was.

There's a moment in The Breakfast Club that never fails to get me every single time I watch it (easily 100+ times). Coincidentally, it's when Alison speaks just two small words... "I care." I always thought anyone who could make those two small words mean so much must be very special, and you proved it to me in so many ways. Thank you again for sharing your story with us. RIP John Hughes. Say hi to Mr. Rogers and Jim Henson for me.

Melissa said...

What an amazing post! Thanks so much for writing this and sharing this with us all.

Galbijim said...

Hi,

I loved reading this. I run a small English magazine in Asia, which English-learning Koreans frequently read it. With your permission,I'd love to share this piece with them. We'd also translate it into Korean. And we'd give credit to you and your blog.

Please let me know if you are comfortable with this.

Cheers,
Craig
www.daegupockets.com

Inanna said...

Thanks so much for sharing your experience and John's words. Its relevant, even today as I still struggle to find my way.

Anonymous said...

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Dusty said...

"...and for a man who took the time to make a little girl believe that, if she had something to say, someone would listen."

We are listening. WOW and thank you for sharing this with us. You write beautifuly.

Dusty said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Dusty said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
JD said...

I am quite moved by this story...I am a huge Hughes fan and often wondered, often aloud while singing the mans praises, why he had left the business. I never heard that John Candy bit, but it makes sense.

Thanks for sharing.

Jason

majaman1978 said...

Just a terific article.

Always wanted to meet John Hughes. I kinda always got annoyed that he was typecast as a "teen movie" director....I first saw Planes Trains & Aotomobiles in my 30's and it's my all time favorite film. Another one ...Ferris Bueller's Day Off...I've seen it over 20 times.

RIP John Hughes...someday I hope I will still get to meet you.

Krista Photography said...

That's the most wonderful story!!!

rgirl said...

i got chills reading your story. it made me both happy and sad. beautifully told. a pleasure to read. thank you

James said...

Hi Alison,

Your comments touched my heart and I wanted to share with you that I, too will always be thankful for John's movies. To this day, I still remember watching Planes, Trains and Automobiles with my brother, Paul back in 1994. It was the 1st time in months I'd seen a genuine smile on his face. At the end he remarked quite simply, but sincerely, "That was a good movie" Sadly, he passed away a month later after a very long battle with cancer, but I'll never forget that joyful time we shared laughing and watching that movie. I like to think that he can now visit with John to thank him in the afterlife. I know I will someday:-)

Linda said...

I am crying reading your post. I think most of us outside the entertainment world don't see people in that industry as "real people." I think you really paid a nice tribute to John Hughes.

notabene said...

Hi Alison,

The Breakfast Club and Ferris Bueller are two of my most cherished movies, because they depict adolescence so exactly like it is, full of possibilities, revolt and decisions.

And fun, too. And openness.

John Hughes will be remembered fondly here too.

Sincerely,
stef.

("Never had one lesson in my life", hehe)

Geoff said...

Thank you for taking the time to share your views on John Hughes. He truely was a great director and I always suspected a great man.

You have confirmed that for me today.

Geoff

Anonymous said...

This is one of those moments when
a person (me) who doesn't have a blog and clicks over from someone
who called your their hero...

and I read this absolutely beautiful relationship you
were sooo lucky to experience.

However, then I read what you
wrote about John Candy and I froze.

John Candy was my John Hughes, and
that still has my mind boggled.

If you want to hear more, (no blog)
I would be honoured to share my John moments, and yes, your Mr.
Hughes was so so right.

and noble.

Excellence in your words.

Cathi
(dejavu3@shaw.ca)

who is wondering if you ever will
even read this. I am so thankful
regardless that I found you and
this was the first writing I read.
Brilliant. and I'm sure you realize that you inspired John
Hughes and became very significant
to him. That's beauty at its'
finest. Those letters are truly
priceless. Thank you for this.

Cathi

Anonymous said...

Thank you Alison for sharing your pen pal with everyone. Reading about the John Hughes who took time to put pen to paper and write back to one fan, when his time was worth as much as it would ever be and at a time when he was as far away from you as Hollywood and fame could take somebody. You really moved me by sharing something so personal and so preciously yours, and meeting the John Hughes who wrote those words to you has moved me in a way that his characters and stories couldn't do.

Dearna said...

That is an amazing story. I was sad because I loved his films, but I can't imagine how sad you must be, having been his pen pal.

phonelady said...

alison , I am going to tell you what my grand used to tell me. people come into our lives when we need them and vice versa . John Hughes needed you as much as you needed him . I think he needed a friend and who knows you might have helped him through the death of John Candy (god rest his soul) and now you must go the road alone and he will always be watching over you and you will never be alone again and you have a special angel in heaven . What a lovely tribute you did to him in this blog . that was great .

Courtney said...

Thank you for writing this. Your writing made an impact in '85 and still is.

chandlerguera said...

I love all of John Hughes's movies, so your tribute was really meaningful. It's amazing how people touch and shape our lives whether they are famous or not and perhaps we only know them for a short while. Thanks!

carrie said...

I'm so impressed that you wrote back to give him hell for sending a form letter. And I'm a little jealous, too. The movies that man made have been such a huge influence on my life.

Thank you for posting this.

ThePantaloon.com said...

Great story. RIP, John Hughes:

"How could I possibly handle school on a day like this?"

Best, Z

http://www.thepantaloon.com/home

Debbie said...

I loved reading about John Hughes. I never could quite understand him. The film 'Uncle Buck' was filmed in my parents home in Evanston,Il. When he and the location scout rang my parents door bell my Mom had no idea who he was. He was very polite, my Mom made him promise that her grandchildren could hang out during filming and that no one was to smoke or swear. (can you imagine?) When they were filming, Mr. Hughes rarely talked to anyone just stayed behind the camera setting up scenes and filming. If you know that movie you know that there are numerous street scenes, so the trailers for Laurie Metcalf and John Candy were around the corner. When they were needed they had to walk about half a block to the house. John Candy was the most delightful and sweet man I have ever been around. As he would walk ,all sorts of children would gather and talk and want autographs and he always joked (and kept moving) and signed autographs. One child on our block had some special issues she dealt with, but she loved his laugh and smile. At the end of the shooting, John hosted a luncheon for her and her classmates at the local school where the crew and stars ate.

One of the most fun days shoot was on our front lawn. The clown arrived for the birthday party drunk if you recall, but what you didn't see was a whole days' shooting of the fight and the clown running off in his car. It was very funny, and also ruined my parents front lawn, but it got cut from the film. When we heard of John Candys' death, we were devastated. Such a funny, natural person. I was so interested in Mr. Hughs' comment about his death. It seems very right on. Thank you for explaining more about who the shy Mr. Hughs was, I believe he was a man of great principle.

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Angie Diaz said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Angie Diaz said...

Hi, my name is Angie Diaz, and I am currently a senior in high school. I am enrolled in the IB program, in which candidates are required to write an Extended Essay on a topic of thier choice, and last spring, before his untimely death, I decided to write about a man who trancednds Genneration X and had a greater impact on me today, than Justin Timberlake ever could. The point of this, is that I am hoping I would be able to get in contact with you via, well via any means possible... A conversation with you would only add to the strength in my essay. My love of John Hughes films, and the hope imbeded in them, began at the tender age of 11, and inspired hope in the frizzy haired, pubencent, akwardly skinny me, and your story only adds to his magic.

kayte said...

Now I love my pen pal more than ever. I'm in the US and he's in Germany. Luke, if ever you come across this note, just know that I love you!!!!

kayte

Brett said...

What a great relationship!

Bridget said...

What a great, great post! And what an amazing story! As a teenager of the 80's, I can only imagine what a thrill it must have been to have John Hughes as a pen pal.

I have a baking blog and we hold a monthly event called "Flavor of the Month." Our September theme is going to be "A Tribute to John Hughes." :)

Anna said...

this story is so beautiful and heartwarming. What a lucky girl you were to develop this special relationship with such a talented human being.

Anonymous said...

I've never left a comment on a blog before but yours is really great. It actually affected me. Thanks.

Christina said...

This post literally made my life.

S Linney said...

As an extremely big fan of John Hughes films I was amazed at your story. I love all his films and they never fail to make me laugh, cry and think. Thank you so much for sharing your story- it gave me a new perspective on someone that I have always admired. The fact that you got to personally communicate with someone who spoke through his films to so many teens is truly an amazing thing.
I wonder if you influenced his cinematic decisions at all? In terms of colloquialisms and issues in plots? Something to consider...

francod81 said...

Thank you for sharing. His movies had a great impact during my high school years. He will be missed greatly.

Alex said...

Thanks for the post! Simply loved you pictures!!!

Anonymous said...

mesothelioma prognosis said...

Nice articles very good job. :)

I can't think of a better tribute to John Hughes than your post. Thank you so much for sharing!!!

Carolyn said...

wow, this is beautiful... thanks for sharing this with a world full of John Hughes fans... you're so lucky to have had him as a friend :)
Carolyn
Chicago

Pamela Jaye said...

I don't think I've ever seen a John Hughes film. I'm not sure whether it was because at the time, I was not going to movies, or that the people I went with did not choose his movies to go to. I heard of them in passing...
Years later I moved to FL where I re-met my brother who I had not seen from age 16 to age 36. He grew up with these movies. Tried to show me one, taped off the TV but it wasn't the same, he said, without the swear words.
So I still haven't seen them.
(Although I think I did read an article about him and them once)

Still, I think it's very cool that you wrote to him and he wrote back, repeatedly.
It wasn't quite my generation, but I think it was my brother's (I'll have to go look up the years)

Thanks for sharing the story. I only just now found it. thanks to VDO. on Facebook. Times have changed. People haven't, though.

Unimportant said...

Wow, beautifully poignant.

I do love stories like this.

Unimportant said...

Wow, beautifully poignant.

I do love stories like this.

The Kid In The Front Row said...

wow, fascinating.

Amilia said...

I have read this story and been greatly touched. Thank you for writting it. I must say that I am very envious of you. What a story to have and what a great man to have it about. Kuddos!

sMacThoughts said...

a person at my Day Job actually told me about your blog post. She found out by an email from a relative who lives a long distance away from her. This is the power of what you just wrote. Thank you for writing it; I am still stunned, tears on my cheeks, happy to have read it.

sMacThoughts said...

a person at my Day Job actually told me about your blog post. She found out by an email from a relative who lives a long distance away from her. This is the power of what you just wrote. Thank you for writing it; I am still stunned, tears on my cheeks, happy to have read it.

Anonymous said...

What an amazing story. You are lucky to have made a connection with such a remarkable man.

Evie said...

That was amazing, totally dead-on post and blog, just had to link to you about how Hollywood can hurt -- http://bit.ly/FhnMk Keep rocking your blog, I'm hoping to know when I get there, too... gonna subscribe now.

Anonymous said...

wow i got a tear reading this

DaMuff said...

I wasn't expecting to come across this letter and only did so by accident and was just about to catch the next wave to some other website ! Im glad I did read it as not only did John Hughes make the most memorable movies from my childhood, the letter was so moving. I did not know he had dies this year, sorry for your loss and to his family.

Anonymous said...

thanks for sharing this. so glad I stumbled upon it.

Therese said...

What a wonderful friendship you had. This is well written, thank you so much for sharing.

malarts said...

This is why blogs are great. Thanks for sharing your memories. I was there in the 80's,and remember the impact the Hughes films had on us young'uns of the time. Carry on..

Nova said...

That was beautiful my dear. Its touch my heart. May God bless you.

Staduzt said...

Thank you for sharing this. I needed to be reminded today of the power of words.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for this. It made me cry. I know what a mentor can do, what the attention from someone 'famous' who takes the time, and who values you for you, means - especially when you are very young and all possibility. And the loss - so public, with so many claiming a piece of it - is so much more yours.

Thank you, again, for sharing. free ipod

Ryan said...

I've never read your blog before, but I've read this entry twice, and it made me cry both times. John Hughes was amazing, and so is this story.

Dracina Dragonfire said...

Thank you for this. It's beautiful and I'm happy to hear about a wonderful person who wouldn't let 'them' change him.

Anonymous said...

Hi Alison! Wow, to have actually talked to John Hughes!!!
Because of some horrific things going on in my personal life, i didn't hear about Mr. Hughes' death until New Years Eve when the news scrolled pictures of famous people who died in the past year.

I was deeply saddened. I just HAD to place a grateful memorial somewhere to express what John Hughes' many great movies meant to me--especially The Breakfast Club. When that movie came out, I was slightly older than the "teen demographic" that supposedly comprised Mr. Hughes' audience. I'll never forget the night I saw that movie for the first time--it was playing at a low-budget downtown theater and I went with my friends, for my 23rd birthday.

I was BLOWN AWAY!!! TBC still ranks as my ALL-TIME FAVORITE! High school was a very painful and depressing time in my life and this movie was "THERAPY" to help me get over it. I have watched that movie so many times I can recite most of the dialog along with the actors. I even used a scene from The Breakfast Club to illustrate a point I wanted to make in my Master's Thesis Seminar. (the class loved it!)

JOHN HUGHES, GOODBYE & GOD BLESS!!!

Term paper said...

It's nice to know that behind those films that meant so much to us was an actual human being who wasn't afraid to be one. It says a lot that he not only wrote to you, but that he left Hollywood in order to remain human.

Stephanie said...

I can't even remember how I stumbled across this blog, but I'm so happy I did.
This is truly a wonderful and uplifting story.
Thank you for sharing this with the world. Even seeing the comments from readers makes me feel as if we are all connected. Thanks again.

Anthraxika said...

Fantastic tribute. Never stop writing, he was right when he said you should write for yourself. While this piece was for him, this had to be theraputic for you. I don't know you, you don't know me but this post has my highest respect in the literary world. Keep it up. Do it for John :)

Anonymous said...

I just saw the most ridiculous and disappointing tribute film to john hughes and thankfully was able to find this blog.

Thank you so much for a glimpse into the life of a man who's work has meant so much to me even today as an adult. I am sad that his life was cut short. I am sad he never lived to realize how important he was to so many of us non-hollywood fans.

May God Bless you and he family and friends of John Hughes. Thank you John!

Anonymous said...

I just saw the most ridiculous and disappointing tribute film to john hughes and thankfully was able to find this blog.

Thank you so much for a glimpse into the life of a man who's work has meant so much to me even today as an adult. I am sad that his life was cut short. I am sad he never lived to realize how important he was to so many of us non-hollywood fans.

May God Bless you and he family and friends of John Hughes. Thank you John!

Anonymous said...

I just saw the most ridiculous and disappointing tribute film to john hughes and thankfully was able to find this blog.

Thank you so much for a glimpse into the life of a man who's work has meant so much to me even today as an adult. I am sad that his life was cut short. I am sad he never lived to realize how important he was to so many of us non-hollywood fans.

May God Bless you and he family and friends of John Hughes. Thank you John!

Anonymous said...

I just saw the most ridiculous and disappointing tribute film to john hughes and thankfully was able to find this blog.

Thank you so much for a glimpse into the life of a man who's work has meant so much to me even today as an adult. I am sad that his life was cut short. I am sad he never lived to realize how important he was to so many of us non-hollywood fans.

May God Bless you and he family and friends of John Hughes. Thank you John!

Anonymous said...

I just saw the most ridiculous and disappointing tribute film to john hughes and thankfully was able to find this blog.

Thank you so much for a glimpse into the life of a man who's work has meant so much to me even today as an adult. I am sad that his life was cut short. I am sad he never lived to realize how important he was to so many of us non-hollywood fans.

May God Bless you and he family and friends of John Hughes. Thank you John!

Tiago Migueis said...

Hi Allison,

I am speechless...

I'm a big fan of the Brat Pack and I specially loved Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink.
But until today, I never even knew who John was and yet he wrote some of my favorite movies of all times...

There could be no better way to show your affection for John than to help perpetuate his memory and his life's work.
You are a good friend!

This is a truly wonderful story.
Thank you.

Tiago

Anonymous said...

thank you for sharing this i hope that when my day comes someone will remember me this fondly

Best Things in Life said...

I read this thrice.. I live in India and I came to know about his death only after watching Academy Awards, I really feel pity that you didn't get to meet him? Such a heart sqeezing story :(

RuGir said...

Fantastic story. I saw this because Paul Tompkins on twitter
Thanks!

tya said...

amazing.. nice story...

Goth Gal said...

I just came across your blog and found myself reading along and I thought I would leave a quick comment. I don't know what to say honestly except that I have enjoyed reading. Beautiful tribute and nice blog. I will be visiting this blog again.

Trevor said...

Hey Alison Thanks for answering these question for me I was angry with John because I felt like when he left he left us (Me) I feel like this world is full of people who want to make it off the backs of there's John wasn't one of those he was sincere and honest its comes out in his stories and how he was with you.

Thanks for sharing apart of John with us, we were blessed by God to have him for as long as we did.

Terri said...

Alison,
Hi, a coworker sent your blog to me knowing just how much I loved John Hughes films growing up. All I can say is wow! What a special connection you had with him. I felt that kind of connection just watching all of his films. It was like he truly understood what teenagers at that time were thinking! I watch those movies now & am right back to the age I was when I first experienced them. He will always be, in my mind, one of the great film makers b/c his were just so honest & real that you felt a part of it!
From a fellow Breakfast Clubber....thank you so much for sharing!!!

Anonymous said...

I know what it means to have a friend like that..I have a friend like that. But we keep talking a lot. We're not pen pals but very good pals all the same. He's my hero, someone I wanna be like. It's was so great reading this! I'm 17, I hope I'll say that about my friend Z too. =)

Anonymous said...

Wonderful, beautiful, a man with integrity!

Queen Geek said...

Wonderful post. Really, really wonderful. Thanks. :)

mimi said...

This is one of the best things I have ever read.
Please never delete this.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for sharing this. John Hughes' movies used to make my childhood (Home Alone) and adolescence (The Breakfast Club, Sixteen Candles, Pretty in Pink) bearable. Now I am transgressing into the "young adult"-category without a guiding light. John Hughes, you will not be forgotten. And neither will you, Allison, because you truly moved me with this post.
With regards from Norway, Astarkvedja.

Sadee said...

For whatever reason, I'm just feeling really sad tonight that John Hughes died.
Thanks so much for sharing your precious story with all of us.

Anonymous said...

alison,

i honestly have to say this is one of the coolest websites i ever visited. im a 37yr old man as of 2010 & grew up with hughes & his movies. im a huge 80's fan & was a child of the 80's and the 80's were my main growing up period. in my book...hughes carved and perfected & defined what 80's movies were about. looking back...i dunno where my life would be without his collection of movies he directed that i cant get enough of watching. hughes death is one of the greatest thats gonna go down in history as the top losts for hollywood stars in u.s. history. he cant be duplicated or replicated. in my book for movie directors...he was god.

id love for u to write back & possibly keep in contact if possible.
dvddan01@aol.com

melissa stephens said...

i looved your story.. thats incrediable!! i was quite young in the 80s but i allways since i was about 4 had a fasination with john hughes films and the 80s in general(my hubby was in his 20s in the 80s so he's really familiar with al lthings john hughes) i just watched the documentary dont you forget about me and i gotta say the end off the movie when john sends back the letter and reel the crew wrote him i was quite confussed.. i think its either a lawyer thing or an invasion of privacy but god forgive for saying something nasty about the dead and a great legend but why do you think he had to be so harsh? honestly ido you think it was a lawyer or just that he wanted his privacy? it was kinda cold ya know? but again yourt relationship with him is a beautiful story and thank you for sharing it<3

Anonymous said...

This made my night. Maybe even my month. I sincerely thank you for posting this.

Anonymous said...

I'm 16 and i recently fell in love with john hughes movies. They speak to me in an amazing way. Thank you for this post, it was beautiful (: keep those letters forever

ROSALINDA said...

BEING A LIFE LONG CHICAGOAN, WE, RESPECT OUR CITIZENS, SO EVEN THOUGH I KNEW MR HUGHES LIVED HERE IN ILLINOIS, THE THOUGHT OF BOTHERING HIM NEVER ENTERED MY MINE, WITH THAT SAID, THAT IS WHY SO MANY OF OUR FAMOUS CITIZENS STAY HERE TO LIVE. I LOVED JOHN HUGHES'S MOVIES. MR HUGHES YOU WILL BE MISSED

Anonymous said...

I didn't grow up in the 80s, but I feel a profound connection with all the films of Mr. Hughes. He's been an inspiration to me as a hopeful screenwriter. I'm a current 18 year old, finishing up high school. Planning some Ferris Bueller days for the end of the year.

Hughes' films haven't lost their power at all. My friends and I all love Ferris Bueller, and I've introduced some of them to Breakfast Club and Some Kind of Wonderful. I don't know why I'm rambling on like this, but... Thank you. That's what this boils down to. Thank you so very much.

I normally don't cry when I read something. I didn't this time. I came...very, very close. Thank you again for sharing your story.

Everything I just wrote was utterly inadequate to convey how much I loved this piece. If you were a guy, this is where I'd say "You da man" for writing it and doing such a great job, and for sharing this.

Thank you, one more time.

Anonymous said...

What an amazing story how lucky you were and how amazing John was to take the time to write you and to reunite years later, says so much of both of you. Thanks for Sharing. What a beautiful story told so touchingly and respectful. Very Impressive peice.

Anonymous said...

This was a beautiful and heartfelt post. I too was very touched by John's films and no matter how misunderstood or unsure of myself I ever was growing up I always found comfort in a John Hughes Films. In my mind he's one of the greatest directors because there was no one who understood his audience like him. He's changed a lot of people lives and I'm great to see he's just as inspirational in person :)

Dot! said...

Alison,
That was a truly fabulous blog entry. Thank you for sharing
Dot!

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Scott Armato said...

In tears. Alison, thank you for sharing this.

However, as the single person John Hughes was intent on making happy with his career, an entire generation owes you a debt of gratitude. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

Oh my... looking through my bookmarks, I came across the one to this blog entry... 2 years on, almost to the day, it still brings tears to my eyes. Thank you once again for sharing.

Anonymous said...

Alison, this is one of the best stories I've ever heard. I have enjoyed quite a few of John Hughes' movies over the years, but after reading this I have so much more respect for him. Taking time out of his busy life to develop this friendship with you was so very touching. He was obviously one helluva person. He had a huge impact on your life and it's great that you can remember him with a smile for years to come! :)

Anonymous said...

Thank you for sharing this. Really. It really gives us all a different perspective of John and surely he was an amazing human being. Again, thank you.

Lizzie

Fatgirlslim said...

Someone wrote a song about you...Starting with The Crying Scene from the Stray album, Frame draws from his whole oeuvre from Mattress Of Wire, the second Aztec Camera single on Postcard Records, to the one brand new song he played, White Pony, a song inspired by the films of the late John Hughes. Based on the story of how Hughes took a young female fan, who had written to him, under his wing, it’s an archetypal Roddy Frame song. The melody soars and tumbles and the lyrics fit together like a complicated jigsaw. “I may write another one next year,” he quips. I got it from this site, it's a recent concert review: http://www.liverpoolconfidential.co.uk/Entertainment/Music/Roddy-Frame-Kazimier?fb_ref=new_comment_entry&fb_source=home_oneline

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