Saturday, August 08, 2009

Sincerely, Alison Byrne Fields

Okay, so yesterday scared the crap out of me.

The phone calls and emails from reporters and literary agents and movie producers and the thousands of comments from John Hughes fans that I wanted to acknowledge and respond to? More than I was prepared to handle — literally and emotionally. Individually, you guys are great. Collectively, I wanted to crawl under my desk and curl up in the fetal position.

I'm shy. No, really.
Sure, I mouth off on Twitter and I can pull off a client meeting, but I get anxious when I'm the center of attention. I'm a private person. I'm an honest and forthright person, but I have always been very cautious about what I share — and with whom.

Beyond that, my correspondence with John has always been an important part of my life, a chapter that informs who I am today. Putting it out there to be analyzed and critiqued risked the possibility that some of the beauty that I saw in it would fade. I've always pushed my clients to be willing to listen to criticism and, for example, allow negative comments to be posted on their Web sites, but right now, I want to delete the comments from the (very very few) who chose to sully something lovely and innocent with their ugliness. As I said yesterday on Twitter — in one of my less eloquent moments — "People who say mean things suck. Kindness feels better — to you and to me."

And the condolences. I don't feel like I deserve those. John's wife, his sons, his grandchildren. They deserve your condolences. Think of them and, if you're so inclined, pray for them as they get through this difficult time.

Mostly though, I was scared I was betraying John. Would he want me to tell these stories? Was it wrong to talk about his phone call? He was raw. Was he trusting me with something and did I not show that trust the respect it deserved? Would his family or friends think I was betraying his trust to get the attention I never wanted in the first place?
I do not want to be known as the woman who revealed why John Hughes left Hollywood. John Hughes wasn't Deep Throat and I'm not Carl Bernstein — or Bob Woodward.

What was amazing about this experience — besides all of your kind comments — was hearing from John's sons. As I told both of them, it is very obvious to me that the generosity their father showed me was something they have both inherited. Thank you, John. Thank you, James.

So, a few things.

I'm not doing any more interviews. Okay, maybe one more. Rachel Sklar got in touch last night and I like Rachel. I'll talk to her and maybe we can do something fun together.

The blog post will be reprinted in full in tomorrow's New York Post. I received a very small fee for allowing them to do so and I am going to give that money (plus some extra) to 826 National, an organization that works with young people (ages 6-18) and teachers to encourage writing. Because of John's encouragement of my writing and the encouragement that many of you have given me to write, it seems fitting. I'd like to ask each of you to do the same or to consider volunteering.
826 National has locations in San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Seattle, Ann Arbor and Boston.

I checked with the Hughes family and they support this idea and encourage you to also consider giving to the American Heart Association or Northwestern Memorial Hospital in John's memory. $10, $20, anything you have would have an impact (remember, it's the little things.) If things are tight and you don't have any extra money and you are in the Chicago area, please consider volunteering for the Northwestern Memorial Hospital. I am confident they would welcome your support and it would be a lovely way to demonstrate your admiration for John.


To all of you who have written to me on Facebook and Twitter to thank me for the post, I am sincerely appreciative for your graciousness. And for those who have encouraged me to keep writing, thank you. It is the thing I like to do most in this world and I guess I just got a major kick in the pants to keep at it.

My apologies to those of you who have asked to be my "friend" on Facebook, but that space is for people I already know. Please don't be offended. Most of the content I post on there wouldn't make any sense to you anyway. It barely makes sense to the people who know me. You can obviously follow me on Twitter, which many of you already have chosen to do. But just know that I'm not always "beautiful" and "touching." Yeah, I mean, I am hardly ever "beautiful" and "touching." I'm kinda grumpy.

The moral of this story? Speak up, believe that there are people out there who will listen. And if you have the opportunity to be the "listener"? Listen. You have the power to change someone's life. Oh, and another thing. Do what makes you happy, according to your rules. Stay true to your values. I'm going to try to remember these lessons myself.

My friend Spike said it would be over today. Doesn't one of you want to make a wacky video about your cat? I hear those are really popular.

71 comments:

Christie said...

Well said and best wishes. Thanks again for sharing your story.

Rachel said...

We may not always be beautiful, but we will always be real. Keep being you, and that will be beautiful in itself, whether you are grumpy, shy, or anything in between. :]

Annie said...

Thank you for being so brave and posting your story. I think that John Hughes would have wanted everyone to know the truth about John Candy ... in fact, learning about the truth behind Hughes's departure from Hollywood only makes me respect him more, if that's even possible. I will definitely be donating what I can to the American Heart Association.

Karen Lee said...

Yikes, glad you are surviving the insanity of the media and the weird, sad people out there. No that people like me, who love what you wrote and that you shared it with every best intention, outnumber the mean people.

You are a gifted writer and I aspire to be as skilled (I'm just starting out as a writer, have contributed all of five posts to the life balance blog below). I'll be following your blog, but not in a scary stalker way...

All the best,
Karen Lee

Kimberly said...

I loved loved loved your piece. I've now cried 3 times over the loss of John Hughes and I'm choking up now just at the mention of his name. No regrets, babe. Because that took major moxie and you should be proud of telling your story. It just proved, even more so, what we already knew: JH was one of a kind and his passing is burning a hole in the hearts of kids from the 70s and 80s.

Betsy S. Franz said...

You are truly cool! I wish I was that cool when I was your age.

:-)

Thanks for letting us in.

Pseudonymous High School Teacher said...

I found your post yesterday from a link at Nap Warden's. It was a moving piece to me, so much so that I linked it under my sunset picture. Hope that's OK.

I'm goign to check out the link to the organization you are giving the money to. As a 10th grade English teacher, I feel a bit on the front lines of teaching writing to young people.

Don said...

Great job all around. You are not a corporate client with a public Social Media face, by the way, you're a person with a personal blog. Delete comments at will.

Funny Girl said...

Good wrirting is hard to find; thanks for putting yourself out there.

TheSteffers said...

Infact I do have a video of my cat, that I think would make you laugh...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iKHkEnoBKm0

Great entry once again. You and John both make me think of my favorite e. e cummings quote: "it takes courage to grow up and become who you really are."

Ride this great wave with the grace that is you. Have fun and splash about a little...:-)

Myra said...

Isn't authenticity and love what all of John Hughes movies were about? You're keeping it alive.

Your writing will too.

You'd better own that kick in the pants.

(and for the record, a lot of us like grumpy people)

Caryn said...

Your belief in free speech does not require you to provide someone with the tools and ability to attack you on your own space. I do social media, too, I get transparency, but this isn't corporate positioning we're talking about. It's your life, your memory, your memorial to John.

Delete the rude, unkind, disrespectful fuckers.

Zip n Tizzy said...

Your post touched us all so deeply because you revealed that a man who was so influential to all of our youths, was every bit the man that we'd hoped and imagined him to be.

You wrote with honesty and integrity and that was clearly recognized and appreciated by his family. You may not be a member of his family but you were a friend. You had the kind of friendship that most of us are only beginning to understand through the power of social media. A friendship between two strangers, who may have never met, but who recognize and appreciate each others talents and develope a close friendship as a result of that.

I can only imagine how overwhelming the response to this post has been for you, but sit with it. You provided a real gift to his fans over the last couple of days for which we are grateful.

I would like to think this is his last nudge to you to remind you of how talented you are, remind you of the young girl you were with all that gumption, and remind you to keep enjoying your writing because it's what you love.

Thanks again Alison for sharing your wonderful story.

Mike said...

Hang in there. I write for many reasons and don't know how I'll handle the story that gets away. Yours is personal, well-timed, and written conversationally, which I'm learning that many people, including myself, appreciate. I second-guess everything I ever post. And third-guess, fourth-guess, etc. There are no apologies due for writing honestly, and from the heart, which your story obviously was. Thank you for sharing!

MovieMan0283 said...

This is great...I stumbled across this blog in a link from a movie site and I can't seem to recall a post I've seen before with over 1,000 comments. Not on Ebert's site, ...God knows, not on mine where more than 20 is a cause for rejoicing! Congratulations on the NY Post piece and you have my admiration for donating the proceeds, though you'd be fully justified in keeping them, I think.

But the thing I liked most about your tribute was that it was needed. I was not a huge fan of Hughes' work (mind you, I didn't dislike his films either - with the possible, and partial - exception of Sixteen Candles) but it bugged me that all the movie blogs seemed to be posting "Well, he's ok..." sort of tributes. And official obits of course acknowledged his notable inactivity for 20 years. Some suggested unfavorable things about him (which, God knows, you could dig up about anyone) and all in all there just didn't seem to be enough good will towards an iconic filmmaker and respect for his impact on movies - and moviegoers.

Then along you come with this - a full-blown tribute not just to the man's talent or savvy, but his character. If he's up there right now (and I'm sure if there is an "up there" than he is), he's smiling...

Keep up the good work.

Vyolet said...

I just wanted to pop by and say thanks again. Anyone who encourages you in your passion should be celebrated and rarely have I seen a celebration so eloquent.
I have to admit, the most comments I ever got on any post of mine was 13 and it still gives me a little thrill when I think about it. :}
To have been bombarded with over a thousand would send me whimpering into a dark corner.
I know your overwhelmed right now so I'm just going to lurk for now as I get to know you and your writing better.
If it makes it any better getting a comment from yet another stranger I'll throw a plug in for my blog... shadesofvyolet.blogspot.com
Have a great day from a new lurker.
:)
Vyolet

nikole said...

well said.

Marilyn Brant said...

Just came across your blog, Alison. Thanks for sharing your memories of John Hughes. Like many of us who were teens in the '80s, his storytelling vision was a lifeline. As an author, I appreciate it even more now than I did then--and that's saying something.

Thanks, also, for your post today, and very best wishes on your writing :).

Virtue said...

but I don't have a cat! maybe I could borrow my neighbour's (just this once) to help you out... best, virtue.

Anonymous said...

My admiration & respect for John Hughes aside, I just want you to know that something you said really galvanized me and helped me with one of the most difficult decisions of my life... No matter what the result, I thank you.

Best of joy to you and keep on writing - even if it comes out grumpy...

Paula said...

Sharing something so deeply personal is always difficult. John was obviously a man who believed in the power of inspiration, and your story served as inspiration for many of us who admired his work. Knowing that he truly cared about you and your thoughts and opinions means he truly cared about each of us.

I appreciate you taking the time to post these two blogs. John wasn't the typical Hollywood slave, and your posts have reinforced that. It's always disappointing to find out that someone you admire is a hateful bastard. It's wonderful to see that John Hughes didn't fall into that category. Thank you so much.

I know it must be difficult for you, but the frenzy will soon pass and things will settle back into a less overwhelming state. Don't second-guess yourself. I think John would have been sincerely touched by your words.

Thank you again for sharing.

herself said...

Besides cracking 1000 comments in your post, there are many, many positive comments that you will never see on Facebook & Twitter as people repost your link, and judging from the ones I've seen, they are all positive & encouraging. "Wow, this post is amazing. Check it out." And today, "You've probably seen this post already, but just in case, check it out even if you just like good writing." That kind of thing.

I've not seen one negative post sharing your link. Anyone who gave you a negative comment in your blog must be a troll.

Good luck with everything.

Spike Jones said...

Thanks, Alison.

I'm proud to be your friend.

Kris said...

A former high school classmate linked to your story. I read every word, rapt, and when I saw your name, I said, "Holy shit!" Which made me laugh because that's what your third-ish commenter on that post also said.

Anyway, you may not remember me -- "Wonder Mom" -- from, wow, three years ago now. You had asked me to join a sort of focus group panel.

I had to go back to Gmail to confirm that you are, indeed, one in the same person. And I saw this in an email that you sent me in '06: "Don't give up blogging. You're too good."

Thanks for sharing your story, Alison. It is awesome, worth sharing, and a good reminder to us all to listen to and care about other people. From what I've gathered, I suspect that you remember to do those things much more often than you forget.

Leah said...

Alison, I remember feeling so connected to John Hughes films; he really captured the awkwardness, alienation, and general angst of adolescent "misfits" perfectly. However, as much I loved his movies, I would never have had the gumption to write John Hughes a letter -- much less write a scathing follow up to the form letter response. I just love that! So, Allison, you were no "ordinary" teenager. You were (and are) extraordinary, and I'm sure that John Hughes was truly inspired by you. Sharing your correspondence is a touching tribute, and I can't see how it could be interpreted as anything else. You're the cool kid now -- embrace it and enjoy it : )

Jordan E. Rosenfeld said...

I like you. So glad a friend posted the link on FB. I'll keep reading you!

PolkaDot said...

Go girl. You wrote what *you* wrote. I for one think it's brilliant, and incredibly fitting for JH.

Do what you need to do, but you're right. Mean people suck, which is why all those movies resonated with us.

yeomanpip said...

There are good people still left in this world.

As you indeed prove.

Heidi Germanaus said...

Obviously your story would make a unique and excellent screenplay. If you don't write it, someone else will.

Anonymous said...

There will be many people trying to cash in on John Hughes death. Thank you for approaching it with such class. You are an inspiration

foxy said...

I just wanted to say - again - that I really felt lucky to get that glimpse into the kind of person John Hughes really was. So, I am really, really appreciative that you decided to share. Obviously, his overwhelming success never went to his head... which is so nice to know. Sorry to hear you got some crappy comments... there's always that stupid bad apple that mucks up the beauty of something.

Cheers and thanks again.

The Basement Rug said...

Alison, thanks for sharing your story and don't worry about responding or even being overwhelmed by the all the demands people are making because of your story. Like everything else in our 5-second world, it will pass. I will be sure to feature John's films somehow in my annual tribute to the dead on my blog The Basement Rug.

Lee Ann said...

As a teacher, I'm ALWAYS encouraging my students to write to those they admire. Most authors respond via e-mail and it's amazing the difference it makes to the students esteem when authors respond.

I've printed out the two blog postings (I hope you don't mind) to use as examples of when a "celebrity" responded to a student and the impact that it made to both of their lives.

thank you for sharing

RickRapier said...

Allison, as I hope I conveyed in my comment yesterday ("I'm the slob who wrote a sequel to Ferris..."), your decision to reveal the private John Hughes will impact the rest of my life. He had impacted my adult life to date, but insider comments about who he was/what he was like had begun to erode my sense of him that I'd discerned from his work.

Like you, I am a writer in many respects because of him and his work. But a hero, perhaps my only one, a role model, has been restored to an honored position because of you.

So, again, I thank you. And I will redouble my efforts to bring something Hughesian back to Hollywood for all our sakes, for our kids, and in his memory. There is only one John Hughes, but I will try my best to do him proud.

Blessings to you and to his family.

Avogadro's Numeral said...

Would John Hughes have had the same Facebook policy? Remember -- you're the one touching people now.

KnitStricken said...

...So that other post (Sincerely, John Hughes)- it was touching, and real, and it made me feel good.

Being of that generation, I found a sense of relief and comfort in your story. The older I get, the more jaded (and grumpy) I get. Your story made me feel better not only about loving and appreciating those films, but gave me a bit of a refreshed sense of optimism and hope. So thanks for that. :o)

But THIS post today (Sincerely, Alison Byrne Fields): Wow.

Your facebook friends are fortunate to have someone like you in their lives.

You've laid out your thoughts so beautifully here, that THIS post brought tears. It's rare I find writing that does this to me.

Keep writing. It's a gift you've got, and I'm glad to have gotten a glimpse of it. I think you've given me the kick in the ass I needed to start taking my inner writer more seriously. Thank you.

My best,
Erica

Nicci said...

Kudos to you for maintaining your grace & composure amidst such chaos. I feel a little guilty for being glad to have found your blog under such sad circumstances, but I am. Thank you, John Hughes!

Anonymous said...

One thing I notice here, the comments on this blog and the earlier blogpost are like 93 percent from women. Why do so few men connect with this? I ask because I am a man and I connect with what you wrote. SMILE!

Anonymous said...

I just read your article in the post and either I am a blubbering idiot or I think I just teared up reading it. John Hughes had such a great impact on me growing up. There was no one else who understood what teens were going through like he did. I commend you for being one of those people who not only says they are going to write a fan letter, but who follows through and gets angry when they get a form letter in return. My best friend and I almost cried when we heard he died. It was like losing a friend from our childhood. Anyway, I appreciated the article and your commitment to all the good things in this world as well!

Charles said...

Nicely said.

janna said...

I read about your blog post yesterday, but just said "meh..." But finally today I clicked the link, and read it, and was truly touched. I'm older than you - I was in my (late) 20s when John Hughes was making his movies, but I love them, too. You never really get over high school!

You didn't betray him in your post. You revealed him to be a man who really did care about the characters in his films, and about the people they were based on. You did a good thing. Thank you.

Jody said...

Thank you. You have brought humanity and reality together in such a simple yet eloquent way. Thank you for not getting caught up on the 'trappings' and for continuing to be honest. Your blog is now a regular read for me. Thanks for sharing your life, your writing and your thinking with us. You are inspiring young people and future writers more than you will ever know :)

Jody

Jacquie said...

Allow me, for the moment, a bit of corniness. Here's the thing about inspiration--it's like an electric current. It just keeps moving. John inspired you, and that inspired you to share that story, and your sharing that story will, no doubt, inspire others to do inspiring things for young people, and so on and so on. You did well in sharing this. It does the world - and what John did for you - no good in cutting that current off. In moments of doubt, know that what you did was right, and powerful, and that it created a positive shift in the world. Thanks for this.

Rachel said...

Wow! Sounds like your world has been turned upside down! Thanks for sharing your story with us. I am glad I found this :)

Kim said...

Again, thank you so much for sharing. I think he would be really proud of you. His family will be in my prayers.

I'll leave you alone now... :P

Christine Gresser said...

Thank you, Alison, for your post on Thursday and then for this wonderfully honest and real sharing of your feelings about all the hoopla that followed. You put yourself out there back then, as a teenager would have done, and you're putting yourself out there today, as an effective writer and blogger is able to do. JH affected you deeply. It could have been someone else, but it was JH. And he was famous. And he made movies. He captured the essence of our generation, which is a little weird since we were in the Reagan and New Coke and Material Girl era... But he understood us, and his movies helped reach in past all the crap and touch something real in us, and now you're reaching in past the crap today and touching something real in us again. By sharing your true (and granted, a little wacky) JH story, you let all of us relate to the Alison character in your true story.

Now, with his death, there's all this attention being paid to his films. Radio stations are playing the soundtracks. It's evoking all these memories of that time for those of us who were shaped by that time. Your sharing your story really does help those of us who feel like we need somewhere to go with all those memories and feelings.

We've all had our mentors and our important teachers, people with whom we've had important and direct personal relationships. By sharing with us the story about your friendship with JH, you let us get to know him a little more, you make us feel like he really WAS ours, all of ours, not just your pen pal but our generation's collective pen pal. And you help us feel even more nostalgic, in a good way, for our Ferris Bueller years. But instead of being stuck in that time, with all the angst and the self-consciousness that we had back then when we were living those years, we get to visit it from the place we're at now. Older, wiser, with many more options and choices, and some examples of happy developments and happy resolutions along the way.

I respect and admire the choices you've made, and that you continue to make. And I honor JH's choices to opt out of Hollywood, even though I'm sad for his struggles and pain. I'm grateful that he was there Back In The Day to try to help us make meaning of things in a pretty confusing, shallow, meaningless-seeming decade. And now, I'm grateful now to have confirmation that the man who was doing that was The Real Deal.

And you know what? So are you.

You'll make a great pen pal for some teen who aspires to be a writer. Lucky kid, whoever it is. Keep up the good work. All of it. Peace to you and yours. And don't let the turkeys get you down. And jesus, isn't the internet a weird, crazy, wonderful place, where you can connect so deeply and so widely with complete and utter strangers? Amazing. Thanks for climbing out on a limb. You're not alone. There are others who are willing to be real like that too. Don't change a bit.

Thank you.

Christine Gresser

Anonymous said...

From someone who knew John Hughes during the last years of his life. He was NOT overweight, as some gossip has said and he did not die from overweight issues. He just had a sudden heart attack. A source tells me:

"Let me just preface this anonymous comment by stating that I live in Park Ridge, Illinois, which is very close to where John Hughes resided until his death. In 2007, I met a woman that had recently worked for John Hughes and his wife Nancy at their home in Lake Forest, IL. This woman had nothing but good things to say about Mr. Hughes. She described him as being a kind and funny man who lead a quiet life, spending most of his time in his office. She said there were many times that he would buy his employees lunch, give them free produce from his garden, and even take them for leisurely strolls around his home where he showed his employees a former secret alcohol storage compartment that was used during Prohibition. She said that he was happy to meet friends of hers that were fans of his, and he often had celebs like Vince Vaughan coming to visit his home. I showed her a photo online that shows Mr Hughes in 2001 with a slight portly look BUT NOT OVERWEIGHT that was posted on slme blogs -- from the set of ''New Port South'' movie -- and she said he still looked like that only he didn't have a beard. So, I guess we can say, at least circa 2007, he was not 500 lbs. Another friend of mine also saw Mr. Hughes in person recently at a car dealership where he used to bring his car in for service. Mr. Hughes had become a devoted family man in the last decade or so. His son John Hughes III, has three children. His other son, James, just became a father for the first time this summer. Just because Hughes was not off directing movies these last years of his life does not mean that he was laying in bed all day eating bon bons. He just had new priorities. "

Anonymous said...

I was privileged to work with him some years ago on "She's Having a Baby". It was a great experience for me to meet him and see him work with the actors and crew. He will be sorely missed.

Anonymous said...

As someone who grew up in "Shermer" (aka, Northbrook, I appreciated his movies more than I can say. They were funny, yes. But they also a commentary of what it was like to live in suburban Chicago. I always end up going back to his films. He will be sorely missed.

Anonymous said...

Barbara Roche says:

"John Hughes single handedly made my career and put my business partner & I on the map. Holzer Roche Casting was just starting out in Chicago when John hired us on “She’s Having a Baby”. We were warned that he was very difficult to work with but we clicked and subsequently went on to work with John on 10 films… including location casting on Planes, Trains & Automobiles. He was difficult, quirky, and absolutely brilliant… so ahead of his time. To keep up with John, you had to get in his head. It was the ride of a lifetime. I will always think of him fondly. Thank you John for the memories. "

Anonymous said...

One of the few people who could accurately portray teenage life and really remembered what it was like to be 16.

Anonymous said...

Time magazine says: "She wrote about her relationship with Hughes on her blog as a way to
sort out her emotions. "I did it just for me, but I knew a few friends
would see it too."

A few friends? More like 2 million people worldwide. Way to go, girl!

Paul said...

Your story moved me yesterday and thank you ....

Bill Smith said...

Alison,

All I can say is thank you.

evsambista said...

Alison,

Way to keep the focus on what's important.

You keep rockin', grumpy girl :-)

Everett

Wolfie said...

Hey Alison,

I see from this entry that you've been flooded with requests for book proposals, film rights, interviews, etc. etc. and I can say, as a fellow shy person, that sucks.

However, don't get overwhelmed just yet! My name is Rachel and right now I'm interning at a really lovely literary agency in Manhattan called Foundry Literary and Media. As a 22-year-old recent college grad whose had my fair share of hellish internships, let me just say that Foundry is an incredible company to work for. My boss, Mollie Glick, is interested in turning your story into a book. She's an incredibly cool, laid back person who knows everything about publishing.

I know you've been bombarded with requests like this, but Foundry is such a different company from any other agencies I've experienced. They're so attentive, hip, and full of awesome people. I'm positive we could transform your story into a narrative that would appeal to many readers.

If this interests you, please just leave a follow-up comment on my blog and I will get you in touch with Mollie. Good luck navigating the media maelstrom!

- Rachel

NukeDad said...

What an awesome story! I liked everything about it; John's willingness to connect with you and encourage you, your tenacity to challenge his form letter and your graciousness and humbleness handling what had to be an avalanche of attention these last few days. Well done.

dj scribbles said...

thank you for sharing something so personal with us. i completely agree with you on this

BCMike said...

What you did by sharing your story not only helped hundreds and thousands of people smile, it helped us all grieve--even if all we knew of Mr. Hughes was his professional work...and maybe had memorized a couple of movies.

Regardless, you pose the question of whether or not John Hughes would have been okay with you sharing your story with us. I don't know Mr. Hughes, but I can tell you that if he wasn't okay with it, he would have been wrong.

What you did was right and made a lot of people happy.

Not everyone has the opportunity or power to do that. Relish it.

No Mother Earth said...

Probably won't mean anything coming from a total stranger, but I really respect that you're not all bedazzled by the attention. It's easy to get your head turned, and I always think things are a heck of a lot easier when your head is screwed on right. Makes me want to come back and read more.

Not The Rockefellers said...

What I wish for you right now, Alison, is for your life to return back to normal...

Peace - Rene

givemeaticket said...

Delete whatever you wish. Their comments are about them, not you. It's the world at large; you're always going to have someone out there wanting to p*ss in your cornflakes. Doesn't mean you have to let them. :)

What you've done is shown an amazing side of a man most of us never would and never will have the pleasure to know. It's cathartic to those for whom his work meant something to know he wasn't 'just hollywood'. Your sharing has obviously also helped his family, else they would not have contacted you. My opinion? I think he'd be proud of you for having the strength to write what you did. That, in and of itself, must've been painful and difficult for one self-described as private. Good on 'ya.

Anonymous said...

ALison, i heard you on NPR today, nice interview, your voice shows your sincerity and more power to you. you did a good thing, don't let the turkeys get you down. those who criticize you do not know what they say. keep going. Love, Marie-Elle LeBrun, Paris

molly said...

wow.
who knew?

Leanne said...

What a great story. Thank you so much for sharing.

Alyssa said...

What you did by sharing your story not only helped hundreds and thousands of people smile, it helped us all grieve--even if all we knew of Mr. Hughes was his professional work...and maybe had memorized a couple of movies. Regardless, you pose the question of whether or not John Hughes would have been okay with you sharing your story with us. I don't know Mr. Hughes, but I can tell you that if he wasn't okay with it, he would have been wrong. What you did was right and made a lot of people happy. Not everyone has the opportunity or power to do that. Relish it.

Perez said...

Go girl. You wrote what *you* wrote. I for one think it's brilliant, and incredibly fitting for JH. Do what you need to do, but you're right. Mean people suck, which is why all those movies resonated with us.

Larry Oserogho said...

Yikes, glad you are surviving the insanity of the media and the weird, sad people out there. No that people like me, who love what you wrote and that you shared it with every best intention, outnumber the mean people. You are a gifted writer and I aspire to be as skilled (I'm just starting out as a writer, have contributed all of five posts to the life balance blog below). I'll be following your blog, but not in a scary stalker way... All the best, Karen Lee

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